11/20/2006
Description
Email spoofing may occur in different forms, but all have a similar result: a user receives email that appears to have originated from one source when it actually was sent from another source.
Email spoofing is often an attempt to trick the user into making a damaging statement or releasing sensitive information (such as passwords).
Examples of spoofed email that could affect the security of your site include:
  • Email claiming to be from a system administrator requesting users to change their passwords to a specified string and threatening to suspend their account if they don't act on the request.

  • Receiving an email claiming to be from a person in authority requesting users to send them a copy of a password file or other sensitive information.


  • If, after investigating the activity, you find that there is more to the incident than spoofed email (such as a compromise at your site or another site.
    Prevention (Deterrence)
    Use cryptographic signatures (e.g., PGP "Pretty Good Privacy" or other encryption technologies) to exchange authenticated email messages.
  • Authenticated email provides a mechanism for ensuring that messages are from whom they appear to be, as well as ensuring that the message has not been altered in transit. Similarly, sites may wish to consider enabling SSL/TLS in their mail transfer software.

  • Using certificates in this manner increases the amount of authentication performed when sending mail.

  • Configure your mail delivery daemon to prevent someone from directly connecting to your SMTP port to send spoofed email to other sites.

  • Ensure that your mail delivery daemon allows logging and is configured to provide sufficient logging to assist you in tracking the origin of spoofed email.

  • Consider a single point of entry for email to your site. You can implement this by configuring your firewall so that SMTP connections from outside your firewall must go through a central mail hub. This will provide you with centralized logging, which may assist in detecting the origin of mail spoofing attempts to your site.
  • Educate your users about your site's policies and procedures in order to prevent them from being "social engineered," or tricked, into disclosing sensitive information (such as passwords).

  • Have your users report any such activities to the appropriate system administrator(s) as soon as possible.
  • Connect with us or request a quote.

    WEBPRO
    Since 1994, WEBPRO has perfected Front Page Marketing that drives more qualified traffic!









    Business or Industry:
    Geography:
    Package:
    Submit Message